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Academic journals have since time immemorial utilized peer review to estimate the validity and novelty of the manuscripts submitted to them. Peer reviewers, therefore, possess substantial influence over what is published, thereby serving as a mechanism through which new research is filtered. But, despite its essential role in quality control, it is not a process that is devoid of errors and therein lies the need for assessing their performance.

As the peer reviewers are responsible for enhancing the quality of manuscripts by eliminating various weaknesses and inconsistencies, one way of reviewing their performance would be to deliberately introduce errors in the manuscripts. Some of the errors that could be inserted would be: weak justification for conducting study, conclusions that are not unjustified, discrepancies between data mentioned in abstract and main text, and tables and main text, variations in the number of respondents, inadequate information about measurement that lead to concerns over reliability and validity and the Hawthorne effect (participants being aware that they are part of a study and behaving in a manner that is different from usual).

If the peer reviewers can detect the above errors, it would be safe to assume that they have performed a commendable job, keeping in mind that it is painstaking work that requires them to put in endless hours.

In accordance with tradition, the process of peer review has always been conducted under conditions of anonymity, with the identities of the author and reviewer kept under wraps. Even though this practice shields reviewers from author demands, it has proved to be yet another way in which the performance of peer reviewers could be measured. A transparent process leads to a rise in cooperation between reviewers and authors, and errors are minimized consequently.

The primary objective of peer review will be under threat if the above-mentioned methods are not applied on a large scale.

http://www.pubmanu.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/blog_image.jpghttp://www.pubmanu.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/blog_image-150x150.jpgDavidResearch Publicationacademic,journal,Plagiarism,research paperAcademic journals have since time immemorial utilized peer review to estimate the validity and novelty of the manuscripts submitted to them. Peer reviewers, therefore, possess substantial influence over what is published, thereby serving as a mechanism through which new research is filtered. But, despite its essential role in quality...
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